65,538-IC circuit adds 64k bits to RAM

Bill Travis, Large-Memory Editor -April 04, 1985

The circuit in Figure 1 represents a difficult and expensive way to increase the capacity of your computer's random-access memory (RAM). Note that the circuit uses 65,538 ICs: 65,536 flip-flops, a 16-to-65,536 priority encoder, and a 65,536-to-16 priority decoder. This circuit's advantage over commercially available RAMs lies in the fact that the configuration draws 197A of power-supply current, as compared with the few shameful milliamperes commercial units consume.

The increase in power-supply current obviously results in a lower power-supply impedance, as expressed by the relationship R = V/I = 5V/197A = 0.025Ω. This low power-supply impedance obviously reduces the supply's susceptibility to glitches and other gremlins. Moreover, depending on the method you use to mount the flip-flops, you can use the circuit for such applications as frying eggs or enhancing employees' truthfulness.

Figure By using 65,538 ICs – 65,536 flip-flops, a 16-to-65,536 priority encoder, and a 65,536-to-16 priority decoder – this circuit can draw a macho 197A of power-supply current, as compared with the few sissy milliamperes commercial units consume.

 

To Vote For This Design, Circle No. 64k

 

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