LEE.RITCHEY

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President

Lee is considered to be one of the industry┬┤s premier authorities on high-speed PCB and system design. He conducts on-site private training courses for high technology companies as well as at industry trade shows and technical conferences. He also provides consulting services for high-end networking products. His experience range crosses a broad technology spectrum including high-end super computers, disc drives, routers, switches and hubs. Lee holds a B.S.E.E. degree from California State University, Sacramento where he graduated as outstanding senior. In 1998, he was profiled by EE Times, as "the high-speed design ratchet man". In 2004, Ritchey contributed a regular column, "PCB Perspectives," to EE Times.


LEE.RITCHEY

's contributions
  • 09.08.2015
  • PCB laminates influence high-speed data rates
  • This solution would waste large amounts of material. Even with that, it is not clear if this would solve the problem. See part 2 of this blog where I cover this option. Lee Ritchey
  • 07.06.2011
  • What happens when you're gone?
  • I'm Lee Ritchey who Brian cited in his article. I agree that the body of technical information will live on after us old guys are gone. That wasn't my point when I spoke with Brian. I teach a class in high speed design several times a year as well as do a fair amount of consulting for startups and established companies. Many of the students are in class because there is no mentoring program at their company and they have had problems getting new designs to work. In all too many cases, very complex designs are being tackled by engineers who have no prior experience with this level of task. There are no senior engineers around who have "been there before" to help steer the design away from problems that have been encountered before. The result in a design that does not meet its requirements, and in the case of startups, often leads to total failure of the company. Among the reasons for this is the VC approach to building new companies where there is no time for mentoring new engineers and only "experienced" people are hired. The limited pool of experienced engineers soon runs out for two reasons. One- the company succeeds and the engineers take the money and run. Two- the pool has a limited size so some startups can't find experienced people and take what is available. It's the loss of mentors and apprenticeship programs that I am concerned about. This leads to far too much trial and error engineering in areas where there is no need to repeat past failures. I suppose I should not complain as it keeps me very busy doing consulting! By the way, I once worked with Bob Pease as a young engineer and enjoyed his column as it was often a jolt from the past. I used his Philbrick differenial amplifiers as well as many of the National Semi op amps and 3 terminal regulators. The were so much better than designing ciruits from discrete transistors. Do they still exist today? Lee Ritchey