Michael Dunn

's profile
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Editor in chief

Michael Dunn is editor-in-chief of EDN, and has been messing with electronics almost as long as he's been walking. He got his first scope around age 15, and things have been going downhill ever since. Scopes now vie with wine racks, harpsichords, calculators, and 19th century pianos for space. Over the years, he's designed for the automotive, medical, industrial, communications, and consumer industries, as both freelancer and employee, working with analog, digital, micros, and software. Since 2000, he's run the TekScopes Yahoogroup, now with over 5,000 members. He was previously editor-in-chief of Scope Junction: http://edn.com/collections/4422580/Scope-Junction-blogs


Michael Dunn

's contributions
  • 09.01.1997
  • Going toastal
  • For an interesting addition to the toastal UI: https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/07/toaster-a-bit-more-button/534312/
  • 07.11.2017
  • Last slide rule manufactured, July 11, 1976
  • I'm not aware of any lower-cost Epsons with refillable carts...only the higher-end ones that use tanks (unless you mean, refillable by a shop that can also reset the chip). My last-purchased printer is an XP-420, selected mainly because of the availability of cheap 3rd-party carts (cheaper than refilling). "I'll go w/ EPSON, who makes OWNER REFILLABLE printers, independently of price." Not trying to defend HP – I'm no fan of their computers either...
  • 11.17.2011
  • Designing with temperature sensors, part three: RTDs
  • A4 makes a standard LPF, so design it for whatever frequency is suitable to your application. Then again, it strikes me as overkill, and could be dispensed with, or replaced with a passive RC to remove any noise...
  • 07.11.2017
  • Last slide rule manufactured, July 11, 1976
  • When photo-quality printers are virtually given away, it's easy to get into a weird something-for-nothing mindset. Then you're suddenly surprised when you can't print a whole picture book on the supplied cartridges. Yes, in my experience, most printers are supplied with half(?)-full carts that let you print for a while. As most if not all carts are "chipped" these days, you may be stuck with purchasing OEM versions, though 3rd-parties have managed to figure out quite a few printers, and offer much cheaper ink carts. If you didn't consider running costs before buying, you can't really blame the mfr. If you don't mind paying a realistic price up front for a higher-end printer, bulk ink is much cheaper... OK, back to my HP 35.
  • 06.30.2017
  • Happy 150th Canada: The Companies
  • Handy Hammond case customization service: http://www.eenewseurope.com/news/distributor-customizes-electronic-enclosures-hammond-manufacturing
  • 06.29.2017
  • Happy 150th Canada: The Institutions
  • I neglected to mention the excellent Museum of Industry in Nova Scotia: https://museumofindustry.novascotia.ca/collections-research