RichQ

's profile
image
Technical Editor

Hi, I'm Rich Quinnell, engineer, writer (threatening to become novelist) and also editor of EE Times' Industrial Control Designline and EDN's Systems Design Center. In my spare time I still review plays (part time drama critic) and still find time to dabble in circuit design for fun.


RichQ

's contributions
  • 09.01.2006
  • Tips for building PXI systems
  • You will have to contact the relevant vendors directly to get data sheets and current pricing information. Those are not anything I keep available. A good place to start for finding vendors is the PXI Systems Alliance - www.pxisa.org/ - which maintains a list of members and the products they offer and can provide you with links to vendors.
  • 11.04.2016
  • Invisible controls you can touch
  • I think that kind of feed back is an exercise left to the system designer. In the case of automotive systems, the developers originally had gesture recognition without any kind of feedback as to hand position. This lets folks feel when they are in the right place, so that's a step forward. And in a VR system, of course, you can see the virtual world; this lets you touch it as well. 2D game systems with only visual feedback on their gesture control tended to make folks exaggerate their motions to activate buttons and other controls because there was no good sense of when their motions were adequate. This gives a physical response to help gauge when you're engaging the system. Yes, it is a bit like reaching for objects in the dark, but it is better than trying to use touchless gesture control in the dark. And we can pretty quickly develop the right body memory when there is tactile feedback like this.
  • 11.04.2016
  • Invisible controls you can touch
  • Yes, I think so. The touch force is sound-generated, and so should penetrate medical gloves, which are typically designed to preserve the sense of touch for surgeons. But that might be a question to put to UltraHaptics to see how they have tested their technology in this application.
  • 10.04.2016
  • Creating JARVIS - Smart microphones enabling the digital butler
  • Jim, I believe he is talking about the applications for Alexa, which Amazon calls "Skills." These are specific tasks Alexa can perform if the user enables them for their device. Some are simple, such as telling Knock-Knock jokes. Others informative such as obtaining status of specific pro ball team activity (Alexa, how are the Mariners doing?) Others provide stock quotes of a portfolio you specify, and so on. Amazon made its API for Alexa open to developers, so that they could expand the range of activities that Alexa could perform in response to word commands. It's one of the benefits of the cloud computing that increased functionality for the device becomes available without the user needing to do anything, not even download software, beyond specifying that they wish to enable a Skill.
  • 09.09.2016
  • 60 years of electronics through the eyes of EDN
  • D'oh! The link to the video is the last thing in the article. At a glance, it looked like an image, but it's the video. More coffee, please... The video is also here stand-alone: http://www.edn.com/education-training/edntv?bclid=870126318001&bctid=5118744500001
  • 09.09.2016
  • 60 years of electronics through the eyes of EDN
  • Oh, duh! The video's the last thing in the article. At a glance, it looked like one more image, but it's the video link. It's also available stand-alone at http://www.edn.com/education-training/edntv?bclid=870126318001&bctid=5118744500001
  • 04.08.2016
  • Autonomous cars someday, autonomous transport now
  • I'm glad I work at home, too. Drivers around here are convinced they can take advantage of everyone. But if folks do start cutting off autonomous cars, the cars will probably start responding by using their cameras to take photos of the offenders and forward them to the police for prosecution, becoming mobile snitches. Probably will flag jay-walkers as well.