Thinking_J

's profile
image
VP

Design products for many industries


Thinking_J

's contributions
  • 08.21.2012
  • What’s your (single) point, youngster?
  • A classic story. A lot of reasonable methods of reducing (but never eliminating) the possibility of this kind of error. - use of zero ohm resistor in schematic to tie agnd to dgnd. - visual tools . (some cad systems) to see current density distribution during simulation. - wisdom of the person doing the pcb layout. But it was ultimately a real world test .. that detected the problem. Real lessons: - always be willing to listen (not just hear) - never depend upon any single methodology to prove a design - respect your elders! georgeg759.. I also get a bit nervous with designs that require really high impedance resistors. Easy to see long term / environmental changes impact things.
  • 01.14.2017
  • CES 2017: 29 intriguing products
  • 3 items... Someday.. (sigh).. I would like to believe humanity will collectively be educated enough to recognize excess marketing hyperbole as something to be viewed with disdain. Pics.. still not coming though (Firefox)... and for some reason the rest of the content is unusually slow. Teen sharing his "tunes" on the flight.. Next time.. Simply ask the flight attendant to address the situation. You shouldn't have to.
  • 01.03.2017
  • Be careful what you name your company
  • Another interesting example: APPLE. Look at the problems that arose when Steve Jobs decided to provide music on the internet. Their long standing agreement and separation from the company the Beatles founded (Apple Records) became broken. A very expensive legal battle ensued... Very hard to predict the problems a name choice will cause.
  • 01.03.2017
  • Be careful what you name your company
  • Naming a company? Trying naming a band... Both can require a very large effort. and both can be very "emotional" Then you have to determine if the name has been copyrighted already.... Important.. but ultimately educated guess work. Who would have thought in the early 60s.. "Beatles" would work as a name?
  • 12.19.2016
  • Proprietary AC/DC adapters: Good idea or nasty trick?
  • Engineer: he who can create with $1 what any fool can create with $2 German engineering: designed to last forever... price is no concern. Japanese engineering: designed to last a long time.. with price being a major concern. American engineering .. we can't decide which customer to design for.
  • 12.19.2016
  • Proprietary AC/DC adapters: Good idea or nasty trick?
  • While I really don't like being forced to buy backup/secondary location power supplies from Dell (or anyone else) .. I have to admit there are legit reasons for for it. Ignoring the cheap / sub-par power supply concerns.. there are other issues. 1- FCC class B.. and CE requirements I have seen numerous "good" power supplies fail radiated and conducted emissions based on the cabling, noise and loading differences that come with varying laptops (load). I am sure a manufacturer doesn't want to assume legal responsibility to cover all of the variations . 2- variations on inrush current capabilities.. causing damage (tripping protection devices) 3- To meet FCC / UL/ CE testing requirements.. you can qualify your product to work with a specific power supply (easy/cheap) or a "any generic" power supply within a given power range (much more expensive and time consuming). I expect the new USB-C standard will eliminate this issue in the near future. I have a Dell laptop.. (M3800) .. and sometimes it misreads the AC adapter and warns me of not using a Dell power supply.. but it doesn't shut down charging because of this.
  • 01.03.2017
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 7: Explosion diagnosis and prevention
  • This news item (Galaxy Note 7 battery failures) is more about how mass media coverage impacts a subject than the subject itself. While the readership of EDN should be able to add to Brian's reasonable list of possible areas of improvement and concern to Li batteries .. I seriously doubt the general population will curb their buying habits of hi-tech products based on their ability to determine when technology limits are being pushed too far. Based on my what I have seen and what I see being "sold" in the media.. Fear (often exaggerated) is what respond to (ironically, selling more of the same products). Resulting in nanny state levels of protection being demanded from manufacturers. Mike703.. "which of us would..."? Answer: nearly all of us. Nearly every material used in hi-tech products .. under the certain conditions.. can explode and release dangerous vapors. Market pressures have always pushed the limits of physics. Every car ever made, Every ship ever launched. Every building ever made. All are designed within the economic limits of their day. All can still fail when taken past what was acceptable limits of risks established at the time of their creation. Much of western society (and it's lawyers) . .have found "zero risk" an easy (and unrealistic) sell.
  • 12.07.2016
  • The mythical software engineer
  • Mushy indeed! Credentials are nice.. but they simply cannot tell the entire story. And they never will. A quickly evolving (constantly changing) world (or it's colleges) will never provide employers a consistently labeled or educated workforce. A well trained mind.. a mind of capacity.. is rarely demonstrated exclusively or restricted to, a limited set of credentials or subjects. MaatPDX.. Engineers often have studied Computer Science also. In fact I have known Computer Scientists .. that have gone back to school to become engineers. I wouldn't limit the constructs of a good thought process to a Computer Science education, It can be found in any subject - if you are looking for it. Favorite line from "The Paper Chase" (movie) Teacher: "You teach yourselves the law, but I train your minds. You come in here with a skull full of mush; you leave thinking like a lawyer. Who knew? lawyers that think.. !
  • 11.29.2016
  • Connected cars: IoT’s value proposition
  • Clean up asset inefficiencies? Let us take the giant assumption that people -in mass- will accept sharing of "assets" and we get the benefit of less congestion on our infrastructure (streets, etc..) . What happens next? .. - we scale down the infrastructure to bring up efficiency? (really? just how does that happen?) - we expand the usage (with more people) till the infrastructure is overloaded (again)? Let us think at least two moves ahead .. before we declare a over simplified solution as valid. At least James touched on a few of the complexities (insurance, privacy). But the impacts go much much further into society. Change will happen.. but if it happens too quickly... can be counter productive. Revolutionary (often destructive) vs Evolutionary (often inefficient). Chose your risks carefully... Apple as a example? they are less than 20% of the total smartphones (global).. and they don't have any simple "mobile handsets" as a percentage of in the total market. Making their percentage even lower. Not quite the overwhelming presence required to rethink a portion of society's infrastructure during the course of 10 years of admittedly remarkable growth. But this is without the burdens that transportation systems have.