steve.taranovich

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Steve Taranovich is a senior technical editor at EDN with 41 years of experience in the electronics industry. Steve received his MSEE from Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, New York, and his BEEE from New York University, Bronx, New York. He is also chairman of the Educational Activities Committee for IEEE Long Island. His expertise is in analog, RF and power management with a diverse embedded processing education as it relates to analog design from his years at Burr-Brown and Texas Instruments. Steve was a circuit design engineer for his first 16 years in electronics. He then served as one of the first field application engineers with Burr-Brown Corp and also became one of their first global account managers, traveling to Europe, India and China.


steve.taranovich

's contributions
  • 07.20.2016
  • Vintage electrical measuring instruments from the 1950s
  • @Rogerburchett---that's an excellent idea. I will ask the owner, Howard Skolnik, if he can do some of that exposing of the insides which we as engineers so love so see. By the way, his collection dates back to late 1800's instruments he has acquired. I only used a tiny portion of his 1956 era devices because of EDN's 60th anniversary this year. Our first magazine appeared in May 1956
  • 06.14.2016
  • NASA Space Station’s top 10 benefits to humanity
  • I can't retire, David, as long as my audience and NASA likes my articles and NASA keeps bringing me behind the scenes to meet the Earth-bound sister of the Curiosity Mars Rover at NASA/JPL Caltech, sitting in an Orion mockup and flipping switches at NASA Houston and early mornings in the Yuma, AZ desert waiting for an Orion capsule to parachute in the desert.
  • 06.14.2016
  • NASA Space Station’s top 10 benefits to humanity
  • Thanks for your comments David. The images in this article were actually photographs taken while I was at NASA Houston during a visit there last year. These were actually on a running video slide show at NASA near the Orion space capsule mock-up and I guess the video was not the greatest---it was out on the work floor in one of the huge NASA buildings.
  • 07.16.2016
  • Power in the supply chain from SEMICON West 2016
  • @MWagner---you are right, it's just good design practice to keep the sensitive and high accuracy elements of the circuit or die separate fro the high power die that can cause drift as its thermals invade the accuracy space in a package. Although, maybe designers will find a way to thermally shield and/or direct the heat away from those sensitive die in the future and have their cake and eat it too!